Archive for category Social Networking

Twitter #Music brings iTunes, Rdio and Spotify together


It is called critical mass.

When you have critical mass you can pull off just about anything.

Who would have thought that competing music platforms like Apple iTunes would be playing nicely (no pun intended) with (streaming / digital music) newbies Spotify and Rdio?

Twitter‘s new service #music  – https://music.twitter.com – just pulled off something many industry watchers didn’t even dare dream about in their best recording-studio-high moment.

How Twitter #Music works:

1. Users can  listen to a few seconds of the (Popular, Emerging, Suggested, Now Playing, Me) music through iTunes Preview

2. To play full tracks users can select Spotify or Rdio and link it to their Twitter #Music account.

After allowing Twitter to access your information, you go through the dialogue to sign into your Spotify [Premium] or Rdio account.

I think Rdio is going to emerge the winner out of this collaboration because unlike Spotify, you don’t require a premium account with Rdio to run your Twitter #Music application.

How does Twitter make money in this? Twitter users like us will now stay longer #scratchhair

Where does this leave Pandora?

Enjoy the visuals!

Landing page Play full track Rdio login 2 Rdio login 3 Rdio login 4 Rdio login Rdio play full track 2 Rdio Play full track Spotify login Spotify premium

Advertisements

, , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

Amazon Kindle Paperwhite is only for right hand use


I’ve been using the new Kindle Paperwhite for close to a month now. It seems to be a good replacement for my 3 year old Kindle 3 (with keyboard)  which died on me one cold winter night – just when I needed it the most.

The ability to read without any lights on in the room at night is what makes the Kindle Paperwhite amazing. I’d pay for that any day. Thanks Amazon!

kindles in dark room

It is an upgrade in some ways and not so much in other ways. Actually, it is a retrogression in some ways.

It’s super responsive touch screen interface is a winner and I love the virtual keyboard.

However, nothing prepared me for the fact that I couldn’t listen to MP3s or play audiobooks on the Amazon Kindle Paperwhite. I miss that about the Kindle 3.

The fact that I can’t plug my earphone into my Kindle Paperwhite is a no, no.

Today I discovered another issue about the Kindle Paperwhite while  on my way from school – the Paperwhite is best suited for holding [and reading] using the right hand.

DSC02009

I had moved the Kindle from my right hand to my left hand to read but realized that in order to tap the [the right side of the] screen to move forward/ progress through the ebook, I had to stretch my left thumb all across the screen to tap there. Or I had to m0ve my Kindle into my right hand just to easily tap the screen to progress.

Once again the Kindle Paperwhite is beaten by the Kindle 3 because it offers the convenience to progress through an ebook whether it is being held in the right hand or the left hand.

DSC02011 DSC02010

 

, , , , , , , ,

3 Comments

Facebook Home Ad – Spot Ghanaian moment


I was watching the new Facebook Home ad on YouTube and spotted a Ghanaian moment.

You know, the Ghanaian handshake [and snap].

That snap of fingers that makes the Ghanaian handshake unique….was captured accurately in the ad.

I’m wondering who, in Facebook’s creative department or their Ad agency team, pulled this off?

I bet this shot was taken in Ghana!

Image 1

Finger snap

The break

, , , , ,

1 Comment

CNN.com hangs Ghanaian youth on bad reporting by motherboard.tv


CNN.com Editor’s note: The staff at CNN.com has been intrigued by the journalism of Vice, an independent media company and Web site based in Brooklyn, New York. Motherboard.tv is Vice’s site devoted to the overlap between culture and technology. The reports, which are being produced solely by Vice, reflect a very transparent approach to journalism, where viewers are taken along on every step of the reporting process. We believe this unique approach is worthy of sharing with our CNN.com readers.

The Background

On 5th April, 2010, an article hit the internet and got the attention of most Ghanaians. The link to Motherboard.tv website was the first that made the rounds and was soundly trashed by most Ghanaians who saw the untruths in the supposed research article. But things soon came to a head when the article showed up on CNN.com on 6th April, 2010 15.30GMT. Before long the story had been twittered and retweeted, the reports read over and again.
At this point most of us were fuming and crying blue murder and uttering expletives behind close doors at the injustice of it all. Didn’t CNN.com see the comments posted by Ghanaians showing their disgust at the inaccuracies and outright lies they found in the article at the time they decided to give it global prominence by featuring it?
Well, the Editor’s note above the motherboard.tv article (Inside the criminal world of Ghana’s e-mail scam gangs) sheds some light on how this situation has come to be and why most people are questioning the editorial policy and agenda of CNN.com. Did it cross the editor’s mind that use of figures like 99% to 1% point to [fallacy of] generalization which is a sign of questionable research methodology? or no research at all? Did he care to google to see our presidential palace?

CNN.com’s stance

How an editor would make a decision to give an article about the youth of Ghana and Ghanaian society such prominence just because ”the staff at CNN.com has been intrigued by the journalism of Vice…” also intrigues me; beats me that thoroughness and honesty was put aside in this case in favour of curiosity and fascination. Is it a coincidence that another definition of intrigue is: make secret plans to do something illicit or detrimental to someone? Does the proximity between the dates of publishing on the respective sites indicate a planned thing? For the conspiracy theorists and linguistics among us, let us ponder this together.

By featuring this article on CNN.com the editor has endorsed Thomas Morton (aka Baby Balls) and his media company and lent them CNN’s credibility if not in all past and future articles, at least in this particular one. To wit, CNN.com is telling us that ‘we would have come to same conclusion if we undertook a research on Sakawa in Ghana’. But in the same breathe the editor manages to insert a caveat (The reports, which are being solely produced by Vice…) distancing CNN.com from any future questioning of the accuracy of the content of Vice’s Motherboard.tv report. Same device is employed again in the note (We believe this unique approach is worthy of sharing with our CNN.com readers) where the Editor endorses the methodology but not the article explicitly. Now isn’t that interesting? One has to leave a wriggle room when things come to a head. Nice job!

When African culture and social structures are viewed and reported through the lens of a young man (Thomas Morton) whose expertise some years back was reporting on sex, drugs and rock music and not done with honest research but with misrepresentations, you bet some of us will show our displeasure.

The Journalist, Thomas Morton

I did a little research about Thomas Morton but didn’t get much by way of his academic background but got interesting facts like his sobriquet, Baby Balls; because he happens to be a vertically challenged man who lives on the edge and challenges the status quo of investigative journalism. He did a report on pollution of the sea and his video report was noted to be laden with so many expletives that his point couldn’t be carried across to the intended student audience. I’ll only say that he’s an interesting fellow with a background in investigating sex, drugs and rock music. Please check for yourself if you care.

Thomas has used unrelated imagery to make his point.

It is interesting to see Thomas dancing with a fetish priest in a possible sakawa ritual? Is that the evidence he has as proof of an underground economy rife with mysticism and sacrifices and blood rituals? I can offer without being there that what he partook of is a mini-durbar or some other traditional occasion. I can assure him that the priests who work in this cyber-juju industry have a cruel air to them and don’t dance for public viewing and no, they don’t dance with white men because they’re undertaking some research.

It is sad that Thomas will misrepresent a traditional cultural event as a blood ritual for sakawa purposes. This is a betrayal of the trust of the elders who gave him the opportunity to experience first hand the rich cultural practices and heritage in Ghana. You can’t expect better from someone who wanted to get his video out anyhow, with cooked up evidence or not.

I can see an internet cafe from a thousand miles and that picture of a man clicking away at a pc is not one of an internet cafe; it is someone’s office. Internet cafes are crammed places whether in Ghana or in the States. What has a birds-eye view of a sprawling slum, refuse dump and a trotro station somewhere in Accra got to do with anything, if not to create in the minds of his audience a bleak economic situation that in his assertion can and is leading Ghanaian youth to take up Sakawa full-time.

It is very easy for Thomas to attribute his perceived pervasive sakawa practice among Ghanaian youth to corruption among the elite without providing any evidence. As Graham Knight noted,”distortions, exaggerations and untruths come easy when reporting Africa because they build upon a set of common themes [entrenched in western media] in which certain stereotypes are taken for granted”.

On my behalf and on behalf of other bloggers and Ghanaian youth who feel globally humiliated because of CNN.com editor’s gross neglect of journalistic ethics of due diligence and fair and objective reporting, I request that
1. Mr. Thomas Morton’s report be taken off CNN.com if blogposts condemning his report will not be given same prominence or,
2. Blogposts from Ghana or by Ghanaians condemning Mr. Thomas Morton’s report be allowed to run alongside it and,
3. CNN.com (CNN BackStory team) sponsors a project with the soon to be registered Ghanablogging community to undertake a thorough research into the sakawa phenomenon.

In conclusion I will say that there are more aspiring footballers in Ghana than there will ever be sakawa-money hungry boys because our professional footballers plying their trade in Europe are better role models and have more money. Oh Mr. Morton wouldn’t know that because he is not a fan of football, my bad, soccer!

FOOTNOTE:

Preamble to SPJ Code of Ethics: Members of the Society of Professional Journalists believe that public enlightenment is the forerunner of justice and the foundation of democracy. The duty of the journalist is to further those ends by seeking truth and providing a fair and comprehensive account of events and issues. Conscientious journalists from all media and specialties strive to serve the public with thoroughness and honesty. Professional integrity is the cornerstone of a journalist’s credibility. Members of the Society share a dedication to ethical behaviour and adopt this code to declare to Society’s principles and standards of practice.

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

4 Comments

The trotro driver who cried wolf…


I hope I managed to get your attention with this one…reading to see what new twist I have managed to put on the most popular of  Aesop’s fables: The boy who cried wolf. I am sure by the time you finish reading this post you will realize that I was only drawing an analogy on the morale of that ever popular story.

But do indulge me!

I have lived all my life in Ghana and I know one thing as a certainty about trotro and taxi drivers; they toot their horns for many reasons and one of the main reasons for tooting their horns is NO REASON.

You’ll realize after a few weeks or months of driving or using Ghana’s public transportations that the trotro drivers just love to toot their horns; in the middle of nowhere, with no passenger’s attention to draw….. they just love to toot their horns.

So if you catch yourself looking into your side mirrors to ‘catch’ what the trotro driver is trying to communicate to you, chances are he wouldn’t even be looking in your direction and you’ll soon know better.

So for all the good reasons that the horn was made for, you’ll realize that it hardly serves any of those purposes when it comes to using Ghanaian roads. Thanks to trotro drivers and taxi drivers we have to battle a cacophony of car horns that incessantly pollute our natural sounds, the ipod, office meeting even our thoughts. It is the hum of the capital, a sign that this beast is awake and about her business. smh

The other day I was sitting in yet another rickety trotro praying to get home safely and then our driver starts tooting his horn. At first I couldn’t be bothered to look at his unfortunate object of horn-attack until I realized it was more persistent than the usual random tooting. Raising my head from my phone (reading tweets), I realized he was drawing the attention of another trotro driver whose back swing-doors were opening with the likelihood that the cargo stashed will spill into the road [and possibly cause an accident].

I was surprised that the trotro driver in front of mine didn’t slow down or even acknowledge our trotro driver in any way.

Then it occurred to me….

This is the trotro driver who cried wolf….and now no one pays him any mind.

, , , , ,

Leave a comment

This Blog!


This Blog is run by me but can do with some guest contributors or a co-blogger.

This Blog is about trotros and public transportation but it has the right to stray every now and then.

This Blog is not licensed but if it were it’d be under Creative Commons.

This Blog is a product of Open Source writing and editing tools and hosted on an Open Source blogging portal.

This Blog is an avenue to let some of my creative juices flow, document my thoughts and try to capture the moment in words and pictures.

This Blog is meant for my consumption but I love you tagging along, your comments and will love a blog post suggestion from you.

This Blog is supposed to highlight how public transport can be fun, infuriating, counter-productive to Ghana’s development and even deadly.

This Blog is about users of public transportation: the driver and his mate, the passengers, the other road users and how they all interact.

This Blog is subject to change in focus because it is an extension of the owner’s ever-changing mind.

This Blog should be cut a slack sometimes, errors are solely the writer’s!

 

 

What does this blog mean to you?

What more can this blog be?

, , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

Twitter is not for Ghana Police, get a social networking policy and come back


…………………………..Part 2 ………………………………..

This follow-up post to Who do you want to be on twitter will basically use the @ghanapolice as a case in point for why a public institution needs a policy/ strategy before entering the seemingly fun but serious arena of social networking.

@ghanapolice

Following 429 Followers 90 List 2

Tweets 6

The above are the stats of @ghanapolice on twitter as of 4th November, 2010, 19:04pm

The above stats point to a Category 4 twitter user – Spammers and Irregular users and it is not helped by the kind of people @ghanapolice is following.

– Ashton Kutcher?

– Oprah?

– Hatoyamayukio? [who only tweets in Japanese]

– Huffington Post?

Seriously, any overly critical person will take the @ghanapolice for granted based on the people it is following. How do the above people help in nation building or policing a nation in a web 2.0 world of e-governance? Who can convince me that the account is not being managed by a university graduate/ student who knows close to little about managing the social networking front of the GHANA POLICE or the serious nature of the job he/ she has taken on.

I suggest you take the time to go through the list of people @ghanapolice is following to understand my indignation. The only plausible case I can manufacture is that the @ghanapolice account was formerly owned by a young person until it was bought from him/ her, just so the Ghana Police wouldn’t have to struggle to get another name.

Having said that, I will entreat you to read the blog post by @ekbensah to get some perspective on the ‘discovery’ of the @ghanapolice twitter account by the Ghanaian twitting public…. THE HUNT FOR BLUE OCTOBER

Below is a guideline that I believe will make the @ghanapolice twitter account get serious:

1. Do not follow political figures – The Ghana Police Service is a politically neutral body

2. Do not follow local or international celebrities – The Ghana Police Service is not about fun and party

3. Do not follow personal friends or acquaintances – The Ghana Police Service is for everyone and not a few friends

4. Do not tweet unofficial or information not approved for public release by The Ghana Police Service

5. Do not respond to tweets or Direct Messages unless it has been officially sanctioned

6. Retweet information that has been verified. Example an accident reported by a local radio station and confirmed by a policeman

7. Draft a daily/weekly security tweet to be approved by the Police Service for regular tweeting for followers

I believe it is the duty of the Ghana Police Service Public Affairs Directorate to clearly state in a policy document how they want their twitter account to be managed; what tweets to be posted on the account, who to follow and how to respond to followers questions, tips or information.

I believe KPIs should be set to measure how effective this communication (public relations) tool – Twitter is being utilized to determine whether it is worth paying an external consultant to maintain. If after 1 month the @ghanapolice account has only 90 followers, then I daresay that someone is not doing their job of getting information to the Ghanaian public by twitter. The Public Affairs Directorate should take the opportunity to talk about the @ghanapolice twitter account when they get on radio stations.

I suggest the @ghanapolice account manager does these in addition to relaying Ghana Police Service Public Information:

1. Tweet on Public Safety or Traffic Safety

2. Daily Security Tips [for Ghanaians]

2. Retweet followers information on accidents or other emergencies

PS: To think that @ghanapolice has no tweets on the alleged? Bus Robbery and Mass Rape Hoax? leads me to think that Twitter is not for the Ghana Police Service. They should come back when they have a policy and want to be open about things.

The latest post by @ghanapolice is a WANTED BY POLICE notice. Sadly it doesn’t come with a picture!

Solely written with Open Source software

Operating System – Ubuntu 10.10

KDE Blogging Client – Blogilo

Screenshot Capture Application – Shutter

, , , , ,

2 Comments